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September 29, 2014 at 11:27 AM

Harvesting hops in the final days of Yakima's season

Posted by Bettina Hansen

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Edgar Silva, 20, harvests Tomahawk hops at Loftus Ranches in Yakima on one of the final days of the 2014 growing season. Tomahawk hops are highly bitter due to their high alpha acid content, and just one of the varieties grown on the farm's 950 acres of hops.

In the final days of the hops harvesting season, reporter Coral Garnick and I traveled to Loftus Ranches in Yakima to get the pulse of this year's crop. Washington produces over three quarters of the nation's hops, and although that may seem like a big industry, they compete for labor with apple farmers who pay workers by the bin, a potentially more lucrative seasonal job. Read the full story here.



BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

A Tomahawk variety of hop grows on the vine during harvest at Loftus Ranches.



BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

The mechanic at Loftus Ranches checks the oil in the front cutter, the machine that cuts the hop vines from the bottom initially. After being cut from the bottom, the vines hang freely and are cut once more from the top of the trellis to be loaded into trucks and taken to process.

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September 28, 2014 at 6:00 PM

Seattle Faerie Festival

Posted by Colin Diltz

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Rachel Bernat, 4, of Bellevue is dressed as an ethereal blue fairy at Seattle Faerie Festival in Volunteer Park in Seattle on Sunday.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

The Seattle Garden Gnome, Dan Kemmis, reveals a ruby to a rapt audience at the Seattle Faerie Festival at Volunteer Park in Seattle. The free festival used to be an annual tradition and was revived last year. Kemmis, the emcee and one of the main organizers, said that he appreciated the support of the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods to help make the event happen. "It's not a big festival, but it's more than any one person could do," he said.

BETTINA HANSEN / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Andre Rebolledo makes a large fairy out of wire and tulle for the Seattle Faerie Festival.

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September 26, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Behind the scenes at Harborview Medical Center

Posted by Erika Schultz

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Life hangs in the balance as team of surgeons, doctors, nurses, technicians and assistants tries to resuscitate a gravely injured patient.

The scenes described in Tyrone Beason's Pacific Northwest Magazine story, "Inside Harborview: An elite team fights to mend broken bodies and minds," were reported over a series of authorized visits to Harborview Medical Center's Emergency Department. Patients who are identified in the story and photographs gave permission to publish their identities.

As Beason writes in the story, "The Harborview ED is a world unto itself, where the poor and uninsured are guaranteed to be seen and where renowned emergency burn, neurology, pediatrics and other doctors treat patients with special emergencies from as far away as Alaska."

The 47-bed department is the soul of the hospital, where teams work on the front lines of health care.

With this project, we hope the public gains a deeper understanding of what goes on behind the scenes at Harborview. Harborview doctors, nurses, anesthesiologists, social workers, lab technicians and emergency first-responders play a critical role in our community— everyday facing our region's major trauma cases, afflictions and social ills.

The family of Seattle Pacific University shooting victim Paul Lee, who gave permission to publish the picture of him, has set up a foundation in his honor to raise money for community-based programs focused on mental health.

For more information or to contribute, visit www.paulleefoundation.org.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Registered nurse Dan Ursino lays a comforting hand on Viviane deBros, who was injured in a fall on Mount Stuart in Chelan County. “When patients come into the emergency room, they are frightened, hurt, upset — and sometimes all it takes is just to put a hand on their shoulder and say, 'I am here for you,'” he says.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Airlift Northwest and EMTs wheel a trauma patient into the Harborview ED. With at least three senior emergency-medicine physicians and about 14 nurses on duty at peak times, the ED can spring into disaster mode at a moment’s notice.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Gerardo Ponce De Leon Ayala can’t hide the pain as nurse Dan Ursino applies ointment to a road rash Ayala got while trying to stop his car from rolling down a Capitol Hill street. He got caught on the car and dragged down the hill. “I was very scared,” Ayala says. “I’m glad nothing happened worse.”

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Technicians prepare a hand for an X-ray. The Emergency Department serviced 66,000 visits in 2013. “We have a really incredible team — from physicians to nurses to medical technicians — it’s an impressive asset the city has,” says Dr. Brandon Backlund, an ED attending physician.

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September 25, 2014 at 7:06 PM

Rosh Hashanah at Matthews Beach Park

Posted by Colin Diltz

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Shawn Weaver, from left, Jonny Sabath, Wendy Marcus and rabbi Jason Levine blow into a shofar, or ram's horn, during the Temple Beth Am's Tashlich ritual in observance of Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year on Thursday afternoon at Matthews Beach Park. During Tashlich, members of the Jewish faith cast off their sins of the prior year by tossing with breadcrumbs in a flowing body of water.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Elsa Keyes, 4, throws bread crumbs into Lake Washington with her nana Christine Lockhart during Temple Beth Am's Tashlich ritual in observance of Rosh Hashanah.

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September 25, 2014 at 1:58 PM

Postcards from the past: Raking leaves, 1972

Posted by Colin Diltz

JERRY GAY / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Fog or no fog, the leaves had to go. Some of the fall crop was raked in by a gardner in the Washington Park neighborhood in Seattle on Oct. 18, 1972.

Postcards from the past is an occasional feature, highlighting images from The Seattle Times historical archive.

For more postcards from the past and links to other posts, visit the gallery


September 25, 2014 at 10:03 AM

First week of fall delivers the rain and the traffic

Posted by Courtney Riffkin

MIKE SIEGEL / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Traffic snarls as commute times from Everett to downtown Seattle reached 140 minutes during Wednesday morning's commute. More than an inch of rain fell in the city since Tuesday night. This view looks north at southbound Interstate 5 traffic from 196th Street Southwest in Lynnwood.

KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Summer officially over, the scene at Post Alley is a gray one except for a splash of neon, as a bundled few descend the steps from Union and First, Wednesday, Wed., Sept. 24, 2014, in Seattle.

KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Summer officially over, the scene in Post Alley is a gray one; a man under an umbrella passes steel flowers artwork, Wednesday, Wed., Sept. 24, 2014, in Seattle.

MIKE SIEGEL / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Daryl Rodgers from Rescue Rooter looks at a giant puddle that formed over a storm drain in a parking lot, at the corner of Fairview Avenue North and John Street, in the South Lake Union neighborhood of Seattle on Wednesday. Rodger's plan is to use a pump to remove the water.

KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

A clogged downspout along Western Ave. near Post Alley unleashes a waterfall along the sidewalk, Wednesday, Wed., Sept. 24, 2014, in Seattle.

KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

It's a gray day in Post Alley, except for a splash of color from the Gum Wall, as a visitor's umbrella rests during a lull in the rain, Wednesday, Wed., Sept. 24, 2014, in Seattle.

September 24, 2014 at 4:13 PM

Northwest Wanderings: An inner space journey

Posted by Courtney Riffkin and Colin Diltz

ALAN BERNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Veronica Malachowski has done more than 50 floats in the pods at Urban Float where the more than half-ton of salts in warm water buoys the body to almost weightlessness.

This player was created in September 2012 to update the design of the embed player with chromeless buttons. It is used in all embedded video on The Seattle Times as well as outside sites.

ALAN BERNER / THE SEATTLE TIMES

It's a space odyssey of sorts in a 7 and a half foot by 5 and a half foot pod--an inner space journey.

Filled with 200 gallons of water saturated with more than a half-ton of Epsom salts, the water in the float-enclosure is far denser than that of the Dead Sea or the Great Salt Lake, giving great buoyancy.

This journey is one of sensory deprivation on a one-hour trip to de-stress.

Veronica Malachowski is a veteran of more than 50 floats.

It's a perk of employment at Urban Float in Fremont. She says the "Ah-Ha moment, this is awesome, I felt infinite" came on float number 3.

She says you can "hear your own heart rhythm and you can hear your own blood flow through your veins."

There can be total silence or soft music.

The float is to reduce the sensory stimulation people are bombarded with every day.

Malachowski starts a silent count at one "until you're kind of dreaming."

Tami Gibson has done almost four dozen floats and says, "I don't think I was asleep but I don't think I was awake." She says she needs less sleep and has better sleep quality.

The pod door can be left open or closed. There's a lighting choice of blue or a rotating rainbow spectrum within the enclosure, or total darkness. The water is skin temperature, 93.5 degrees Fahrenheit.

Let your spine stretch out, don't flex a single muscle and take the weight off your frame.

Gibson says, "you haven't felt this sensation since you were in the womb."

- Alan Berner, Seattle Times Staff Photographer, aberner@seattletimes.com.

September 23, 2014 at 5:20 PM

Moving into a new school year

Posted by Colin Diltz

KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Incoming University of Washington senior Chelsea Brossard gets help moving into an apartment by her fiancé, Eric Schwartz, on Tuesday in Seattle. After summer break, UW resumes Wednesday.

KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES

University of Washington students pass a 28-foot-tall inflatable installation, appearing to wear some purple, entitled "Lone Stranger," a 2014 work by Piper O'Neill, part of "Mad Campus," an outdoor public art exhibition on Seattle's UW campus. According to information at the artwork, O'Neill holds a Masters of Communication in Digital Media from UW and has been commissioned to create several public artworks.

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