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June 5, 2013 at 9:08 PM

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Learning the right moves


ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Maurice Fields, left, and Carolyn Tran participate in Detective Cookie's Urban Youth Chess Club's annual tournament at Van Asselt Elementary School in Seattle on Wednesday. Around 100 students from Van Asselt and South Shore K-8 School competed in the tournament.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Seattle police Detective Denise "Cookie" Bouldin started the anti-violence and youth chess program at Rainier Beach Library. The program eventually expanded into both schools and the Rainier Vista Boys & Girls Club. South Shore fifth-grade teacher Kate Eads said the game teaches students critical thinking skills that can help them in the real world.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

South Shore fifth graders Jaishaun Howard and Koby Moore, not pictured, play chess during Detective Cookie's Urban Youth Chess Club annual tournament at Van Asselt Elementary School. "It teaches me about the world," Howard said, about the game.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

Seattle Police Detective Denise "Cookie" Bouldin plays chess with fifth grader Maya Sanders.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

South Shore K-8 students Rio Sandoval, center, and Luke Fairchild, right, participate in Detective Cookie's Urban Youth Chess Club annual tournament at Van Asselt Elementary School.

ERIKA SCHULTZ / THE SEATTLE TIMES

About 100 students from the Van Asselt and South Shore K-8 School competed in Detective Cookie's Urban Youth Chess Club annual tournament at Van Asselt Elementary School. South Shore fifth grader Ayan Hersi, center, said she enjoyed chess because "It's a thinking game."

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